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Ivermectin in COVID-19

Frequently Asked Questions

answered by Dr. Pierre Kory and Dr. Paul Marik (FLCCC Alliance)
(last updated August 31, 2021)

 

There are many questions about COVID-19 prevention and treatment, and that’s understandable. Below we provide detailed and comprehensive answers to the most common questions we have received.

About Ivermectin

There are many questions about COVID-19 prevention and treatment, and that’s understandable. Below we provide detailed and comprehensive answers to the most common questions we have received. First and foremost, many simply ask, “Can ivermectin really do all you’ve said it can do—prevent and treat all phases of COVID -19 disease? It seems too good to be true – again.”

The answer to this question relies on the fact that ivermectin, since its development 40 years ago, has already demonstrated its ability to make historic impacts on global health, given that it led to the eradication of a “pandemic” of parasitic diseases across multiple continents. These impacts are what awarded the discoverers of ivermectin the 2015 Nobel Prize in Medicine.

More recently, profound anti-viral and anti-inflammatory properties of ivermectin have been identified. In COVID-19 specifically, studies show that one of its several anti-viral properties is that it strongly binds to the spike protein, keeping the virus from entering the cell. These effects, along with its multiple abilities to control inflammation, both explain the markedly positive trial results already reported, and poise ivermectin to again achieve similar historic impacts via the eradication of COVID-19.

Because Ivermectin has 5 different mechanisms of action against coronaviruses, the medication is also effective with the different variants of the virus. We have adjusted our dosage of Ivermectin in the protocols and have added additional medications and measures to help make the protocols more effective against the variants. The current protocols can be found online here. Always discuss the protocols first with your own physician.

When taking Ivermectin please take the medication with or after your meal.
Ivermectin is a fat soluble drug and the absorption of Ivermectin is enhanced in the body’s tissues with a fatty meal.

Making a risk/benefit decision at this time, with the currently available data showing consistent high efficacy and safety with mortality benefits from 24 controlled trials, would far exceed the strength and validity of the rationales used to adopt the entirety of currently employed therapeutics in COVID-19 given all were adopted in the setting of either

  • weak clinical impacts measured (remdesivir, monoclonal antibodies, convalescent plasma);
  • high costs (remdesivir, monoclonal antibodies, convalescent plasma, vaccines);
  • significant adverse effects (remdesivir, vaccines);
  • weak, conflicting, or non-existing evidence bases to support use (remdesivir, monoclonal antibodies, convalescent plasma);
  • conflicting treatment guidelines (remdesivir – WHO and NIH recommendations conflict);
  • non-peer reviewed studies (remdesivir, monoclonal antibodies, convalescent plasma);
  • absence of even pre-print study data available for wider scientific review (vaccines).

12 of the 24 controlled trials results are prospective and randomized and include over 2,000 patients. Again, note that the RECOVERY trial which made corticosteroids the standard of care in COVID-19 overnight was a randomized controlled trial which included 2,000 patients treated with dexamethasone. Further, the number of patients in the 9 observational controlled trials also total over 4,000 patients. Thus, we now have nearly 7,000 patients and 24 controlled trials of ivermectin in varying sizes and designs and countries, with nearly all resulting in consistent, reproducible, large magnitude, statistically significant findings of efficacy as a prophylactic and in early and late phase disease. Given these marked reductions in transmission, hospitalizations, and death, any further studies using a placebo would be unethical. For any who require more clinical trials data, well-designed observational controlled trials are a perfectly valid alternative and will (and should) be conducted by many, even after adoption as a treatment agent.

There are several reasons why such a study would likely be unethical to conduct at the current time. We agree that further studies can and should be done but placebo controlled RCT’s should be avoided due to the following:

  • Currently, a total of over 3,000 patients have been included within numerous randomized, controlled trials with the overall signal of benefit in important clinical outcomes strongly positive with tight confidence intervals. This would make the likelihood of causing significant harm to study subjects in a medical research trial using placebo to be unacceptably high given excessive morbidity and mortality associated with COVID-19.
  • Further, the  WHO ACT Accelerator Program sub-section focused on treatments for COVID-19 and headed by UNITAID has hired research consultants to identify and perform a global systematic review and meta-analysis of all active ivermectin trials in COVID-19. The consultant anticipates having results available from several additional, large clinical trials within the next 4 weeks, and predicts the accumulation of sufficient patient data in these trials to reach a conclusion and recommendation for or against use of ivermectin in COVID-19 during the month of January 2021. Preliminary analyses by the consultants were recently presented at an international research conference and all the available trial results at the time strongly supported the efficacy of ivermectin in COVID-19. If, based on the projected amount of trial data in the coming month, a recommendation for use of ivermectin in COVID-19 is issued by the WHO, any planned subsequent placebo-controlled trials would have to be terminated.

“Peacetime” processes of waiting for “the perfect clinical trial” when we are “at war” with rising case counts, dwindling hospital beds, and increasing deaths is illogical and also unethical as above. All therapeutic decisions in medicine involve implicit risk/benefit calculations. When considering a safe, low-cost, widely available medicine that has been repeatedly shown to lead to consistent mortality and transmission decreases, deferring adoption of this therapy while waiting for “perfect” or “unassailable” data is far more likely to cause excessive harm compared to the lower risk of adopting a safe, low-cost therapy. Again, based on a minimum of the 24 controlled trials results available, the odds that ivermectin is ineffective is 1 in 67 million as per the Covid19 study research group above. Ivermectin can and will be studied in well-designed observational trials which can provide equally accurate conclusions.

The odds that, in the US, we continue to descend further into a humanitarian disaster of historically adverse economic and public health impacts is simply the current reality. Humanist pragmatism, utilizing a therapeutic benefit/safety calculation must be emphasized in place of the now standard, overly strict evidence-based medicine paradigm given the state of the current public health crisis. Further, the numerous careful analyses reporting that, in regions with ivermectin distribution campaigns, precipitous decreases in both case counts and case fatality rates occurred immediately after these efforts began, this further supports the validity and soundness of the decision to immediately adopt ivermectin in the prophylaxis and treatment of COVID-19.

All clinical trials suffer from risks of bias in their design and conduct, as assessed by the Cochrane Risk of Bias 2.0 tool that assesses trial biases with the grades of “some concern, low, moderate, high, or serious”. Although one group of authors has assessed many of the trials as having moderate to severe risks of bias, performing meta-analyses of these trials can more accurately detect the true effects despite individual trial biases. Multiple groups, including ours, have performed meta-analyses of these trials, with all groups finding consistent benefits amongst the trials. In fact, the consistency of trial results from both sets of randomized and observational controlled trials from varied centers and countries and trial sizes and disease phases lend even more validity to the estimates of benefit. The references/links to two large meta-analyses can be found below, in addition to the meta-analyses of both prophylaxis and treatment trials performed in our review manuscript:

While a minority have been “small” (generally defined as including less than 100 patients, particularly when looking at mortality as an endpoint), the majority have been large, with several including hundreds of patients. The smaller studies were, as expected, less likely to find statistically significant differences, while every randomized controlled trial (RCT) which included over 100 patients found highly statistically significant differences in important clinical outcomes, reporting decreases in rates of transmission, progression, or mortality as follows:

  • 3 prophylaxis RCT’s with > 100 patients – large benefits, all statistically significant;
  • 3 outpatient RCT’s with > 100 patients – large benefits, all statistically significant;
  • 4 hospital patient RCT’s with > 100 patients – large benefits, all statistically significant.

Further, the total number of patients within controlled trials now include over 6,500 patients with over 2,500 within randomized, controlled trials alone. This number of randomized patient data now approaches the number of treated patients with the RECOVERY randomized controlled trial, a study whose results immediately transformed the treatment of COVID-19 with widespread adoption of corticosteroids in patients with moderate to severe illness.

The decision to adopt hydroxychloroquine was made early in the pandemic, when, despite the lack of clinical trials data to support use, there existed a scientific rationale given pre-clinical data suggesting anti-viral and anti-inflammatory properties. Thus, the decision at that time was likely a sound one based on a risk/benefit calculation given HCQ’s low cost, minimal adverse effect profile, wide availability/ease of compounding, and long history of use. Such a decision was also entirely in keeping with Principle 37 of the Helsinki Agreement on Medical Research, first formulated in 1964, which declares that “physicians may use an unproven intervention if in the physician’s judgement it offers hope of saving life, re-establishing health or alleviating suffering. This intervention should subsequently be made the object of research.” In keeping with Declaration 37, immediately after the widespread adoption of HCQ, studies were immediately conducted by many centers. Unfortunately, all of the RCT’s reported negative results which led to rapid de-adoption with the exception of sporadic continued use in early phase disease. Note that the current widespread non-adoption of ivermectin in the face of hundreds of thousands of ill and dying, currently violates Declaration 37 in that adoption is being purposely and overtly avoided despite the efficacy/risk assessment of now numerous well controlled trials including over 3,000 total patients which report massive drops in transmission and large decreases in mortality when used in the treatment of COVID-19 patients. The data supporting adoption is now approaching that of corticosteroids, where widespread use began almost immediately upon the reporting of results of the 6,000 patient RECOVERY trial which demonstrated a mortality benefit (with only 2,000 patients treated with corticosteroids in that trial).

  • Every observational trial (ignoring the massive case series for a moment) that has studied ivermectin in COVID-19 have matched control groups for comparison, with some controlled using a technique called propensity-matching and with many others using contemporaneous, well-matched control groups of patients who did not receive ivermectin by their treating doctor (one would need a close reading of each study to see how well matched they are).
  • Observational controlled trials have historically been shown to reach identical conclusions to randomized controlled trials on average in almost all disease models and treatments studied. This fact has been reported in systematic reviews comparing findings from these trial designs and published in the Cochrane database multiple times. It is a fact and a truth about evidence-based medicine that is both neither taught nor emphasized by most of academia who have recently been described, for this reason, as “RCT fundamentalists.” We remind all that observational trials are scientifically valid and should be relied upon, even more so in a pandemic.
  • The consistency of findings among the observational and randomized trials of ivermectin is both profound and unique when large numbers of trials have accumulated in the study of a particular medicine. What is most often the case if not the rule, “conflicting results” between trials are typically found, particularly when the medicine is not potent and/or some of the trials are poorly designed. The remarkable consistency the trials studying ivermectin in COVId-19 cannot be over-emphasized. That consistency is unique and persuasive given the diverse set of centers and countries and sizes and designs and phases of illness studied in those trials. It was exactly this consistency that first alerted Professor Paul Marik and the FLCCC Alliance to ivermectin’s efficacy. That consistency has reliably continued in the face of rapidly increasing numbers of trial results becoming available.
  • 14 of the 24 controlled trial results have been peer reviewed, along with 2 of the 5 case series.
  • Applying findings from trial manuscripts posted on pre-print servers have been a standard in many of the sciences, including medicine, particularly during the pandemic. Every novel therapeutic that has been widely adopted in medical practice during COVID-19 happened before the peer-reviewed manuscript was available for analysis by the medical community, with the exception of hydroxychloroquine which was initially adopted without any posted or published clinical evidence base. Examples of pre-print adopted therapeutics are remdesivir, corticosteroids, monoclonal antibodies, convalescent plasma and the vaccines. Again, all were widely adopted before succeeding the peer-review process.
  • Note that the vaccines represent an even more unique case as inoculations of citizens began even before a pre-print manuscript was made available for wider review by the scientific community. Thus, to dismiss the value of ivermectin study results because only 50% have been published in peer-reviewed journals, would suddenly create a new evidentiary standard at a critical point in the pandemic that willfully ignores both the extreme importance that pre-prints play in the rapid dissemination of medical knowledge as well as the reason for their creation. Peer-review takes months. We do not have months. Thousands are dying every day.

Such concerns reflect a surprising degree of ethnocentrism that we believe will lead to further harms against humanity. We cannot deny that these concerns currently present a significant barrier for the evidence compiled in our manuscript to influence practice. We recently learned that a COVID-19 therapeutics committee of a large hospital health care system in the Midwest recently reviewed the existing trials data for ivermectin in November and decided not to recommend ivermectin, with one of the stated reasons being that “many of the studies were performed abroad and are likely not generalizable to our patients”. The belief that a potent anti-viral medicine only works in foreigners and not in Americans is ludicrous and deserves no further comment or explanation except to note it as an example of the most extreme skepticism that can be displayed by providers who simply “do not believe” in the efficacy of ivermectin.

The epidemiologic data presented in our manuscript essentially provides the strongest level of medical evidence attainable as they consist of findings from what should be considered large, real-world “natural experiments” which spontaneously occurred within many cities and regions of the world when local and regional health ministries decided to initiate widespread ivermectin distribution to their citizen populations. The “control groups” in these natural experiments were the neighboring cities and regions that did not employ widespread ivermectin distribution. In the areas with ivermectin use compared to those without, large and temporally associated decreases in case counts and fatalities were found after the ivermectin distribution began. Again, the magnitude and reproducibility from city to city, region to region and country to country is unassailable. All data were sourced from universally used, publicly available COVID-19 epidemiologic databases. The manuscript by Chamie et al which focuses solely on these data, is currently near submission for publication, and has now been refined and reviewed by scientists and researchers under the direction of a dean at a major medical research university. A number of these scientist researchers have joined as co-authors of this historically important manuscript.

The theory that ivermectin’s anti-viral activity is dependent on unachievable tissue concentrations is incorrect as follows:

  • In the cell culture study by Caly et al from Monash University in Australia, although very high concentrations of ivermectin were used, this was not a human model. Humans have immune and circulatory systems working in concert with ivermectin, thus concentration required in humans have little relation to concentrations used in a laboratory cell culture. Further, prolonged durations of exposure to a drug likely would require a fraction of the dosing in a short-term cell model exposure.
  • There are multiple mechanisms by which ivermectin is thought to exert its anti-viral effects, with the least likely mechanism that of the blocking of importins as theorized in the Monash study above. These other mechanisms are not thought to require either supraphysiologic doses or concentrations and include
  1. competitive binding of ivermectin with the host receptor-binding region of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, limiting binding to the ACE-2 receptor;
  2. binding to the SARS-CoV-2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), thereby inhibiting viral replication (Swargiary, 2020);
  3. binding/interference with multiple essential structural and non-structural proteins required by the virus in order to replicate.
  • The theory that ivermectin would need supraphysiologic tissue concentration to be effective is most strongly disproven by the now 24 controlled clinical trials which used standard doses of ivermectin yet reported large clinical impacts in reducing rates of transmission, deterioration, and mortality.

Multiple countries and regions have formally adopted ivermectin into their treatment guidelines, with several having done so only recently, based on the emerging data compiled by the FLCCC Alliance.

Examples include:

  • North Macedonia – December 23, 2020
  • Belize – December 22,2020
  • Uttar Pradesh in Northern India – a state with 210 million people – adopted early home treatment kits which include ivermectin on October 10, 2020
  • State of Alto Parana in Paraguay – September 6, 2020
  • Capital City of Lucknow in Uttar Pradesh – August 22, 2020
  • State of Chiapas, Mexico – August 1, 2020
  • 8 state health ministries in Peru – Spring/summer 2020
  • Lima, Peru – Many clinics, districts use and distribute ivermectin, as of October the hospitals no longer use.

You can find information at the two links below, one our this website and the other run by global clinician/researchers who have been staying on top of this issue.

https://covid19criticalcare.com/ivermectin-in-covid-19/epidemiologic-analyses-on-covid19-and-ivermec…  

https://www.ivermectin.africa/2021/05/24/video-the-1st-ivermectin-for-covid-19-summit/

(Questions regarding interactions with vaccines are in the section “About the Covid Vaccines” that follows.)

Ivermectin Safety

The discovery of ivermectin in 1975 was awarded the 2015 Nobel Prize in Medicine given its global impact in reducing onchocerciasis (river blindness), lymphatic filiariasis, and scabies in endemic areas of central Africa, Latin America, India and Southeast Asia.  It has since been included on the WHO’s “List of Essential Medicines with now over 4 billion doses administered. Numerous studies report low rates of adverse events, with the majority mild, transient, and largely attributed to the body’s inflammatory response to the death of  parasites and include itching, rash, swollen lymph nodes, joint paints, fever and headache. In a study which combined results from trials including over 50,000 patients, serious events occurred in less than 1% and largely associated with administration in Loa Loa infected patients. Further, according to the pharmaceutical reference standard Lexicomp, the only medications contra­indicated for use with ivermectin are the concurrent administration of anti-tuberculosis and cholera vaccines while the anticoagulant warfarin would require dose monitoring. Another special caution is that immunosuppressed or organ transplant patients who are on calcineurin inhibitors such as tacro­limus or cyclosporine or the immunosuppressant sirolimus should have close monitoring of drug levels when on ivermectin given that interactions exist which can affect these levels. A longer list of drug interactions can be found on the database of  www.drugs.com/ivermectin.html, with nearly all interactions leading to a possibility of either increased or decreased blood levels of ivermectin. Given studies showing tolerance and lack of adverse effects in human subjects given even escalating, high doses of ivermectin, toxicity is unlikely although a reduced efficacy due to decreased levels may be a concern. Finally, ivermectin has been used safely in pregnant women, children, and infants.

Immunosuppressed or organ transplant patients who are on calcineurin inhibitors such as tacrolimus or cyclosporine or the immunosuppressant sirolimus should have close monitoring of drug levels when on ivermectin given that interactions exist which can affect these levels. A longer list of drug interactions can be found on the database of  www.drugs.com/ivermectin.html, with nearly all interactions leading to a possibility of either increased or decreased blood levels of ivermectin. Given studies showing tolerance and lack of adverse effects in human subjects given even escalating, high doses of ivermectin, toxicity is unlikely although a reduced efficacy due to decreased levels may be a concern.

We cannot provide treatment recommendations for patients that are not under our direct care. However, we can offer interested patients, families, and health care providers our COVID-19 treatment expertise and guidance contained in our published and pre-published manuscripts. Based on the current research that we have reviewed, we believe that Ivermectin is safe in these disease processes. We recommend that you discuss the protocols on our website with your own doctor since they are familiar with your health history. If you are looking for a doctor who will prescribe Ivermectin for you, please follow the information from this link on our website. For more information about the interaction of Ivermectin with blood thinners we recommend that you ask your own physician and you can look here for the database of lists of drug reactions with Ivermectin from drugs.com.

In regards to liver disease, ivermectin is well tolerated, given that there is only a single case of liver injury reported one month after use that rapidly recovered. Ivermectin has not been associated with acute liver failure or chronic liver injury. Further, no dose adjustments are required in patients with liver disease.

For more information about the interaction of Ivermectin with hydroxychloroquine we recommend that you ask your own physician and you can look here for the database of lists of drug reactions with Ivermectin from drugs.com. You can also discuss with your doctor the use of the I-MASK+ protocol for prophylaxis against Covid-19 which has been shown to be very effective in using Ivermectin.

Yes, the ivermectin in both formulations is pharmacologically equivalent, however there is a difference in the amount of impurities contained within each. The human formulations have highly regulated and thus very low levels of impurities. We cannot recommend veterinary formulations given the lack of safety data around their use, however we are also not aware of any associated toxicity. Liquid veterinary formulations intended for subcutaneous administration have almost no impurities and can be administered by mouth and thus are likely a safer product. However, the FLCCC does not recommend veterinary formulations and instead emphasizes the critical need for our leading health care agencies to approve and recommend use of human formulations to health care providers.

Ivermectin for Pregnancy, Infants, Children

Based on the current research, Ivermectin prophylaxis is not recommended to be used while pregnant, especially in the first trimester. Ivermectin prophylaxis is also not recommended if you are trying to become pregnant. For treatment with Ivermectin, this should be a risk/benefit decision that you need to discuss with your own physician. There has been teratogenicity found in animal studies with HIGH DOSES of Ivermectin. Pregnancy is not an exclusion criteria by the WHO for mass distribution of Ivermectin for parasitic infections (the only exclusion criteria is the age of a child less than 6 months).The health of the mother is the biggest predictor of health of the baby – if a pregnant woman is becoming ill with Covid-19, and has moderate or severe symptoms, the decision to use Ivermectin should be a decision between the mother and the physician. Currently breastfeeding is not recommended while the mother is taking ivermectin and for at least a week after stopping ivermectin, based on the limited available data. This study can be shared with your physician along with our other protocols.

Children and teenagers usually have milder symptoms when they contract Covid-19. Since the protocols use a multi-drug approach to prevent and combat the virus, we recommend that children only use the vitamins in the protocol. If your child becomes very ill with Covid-19 you should immediately consult your child’s pediatrician and discuss the use of Ivermectin and the protocols with them.

NIH, FDA, WHO Recommendations

We are unable to identify a consistent approach to the strength and timing of NIH recommendations and/or updates to the recommendations as illustrated in the following examples:

Convalescent plasma use was adopted early in the pandemic and fell into widespread use despite the absence of supportive clinical trials evidence at the time and the high cost/resource use associated. The current NIH recommendation, last updated July 17th, 2020 is that “there are insufficient data to recommend either for or against use.” As of December 26, 2020, 7 RCT’s and 6 OCT’s have been conducted without reporting a single statistically significant clinical outcome benefit. No updated recommendation has been issued despite these trial results. Widespread use continues.

Remdesivir – a purported anti-viral agent, currently has been given a “neutral” recommendation (i.e., neither for or against use) by the NIH in hospital patients who are not on oxygen, while it has a B-IIa in support of use in hospitalized patients on supplemental oxygen only (i.e., without need for either high flow or any form of mechanical ventilation). A B-IIa indicates that the recommendation is of moderate strength and is based on either an RCT with a major limitation or from a sub-group analysis of an RCT. The RCT used in support of this recommendation found that in a subgroup or patients that received 5 days of remdesivir, their clinical condition on Day 11 was improved compared to standard care although the sub-group that received 10 days of therapy did not achieve an improved clinical condition on day 11. Note also that remdesivir is high cost (over $3,000 per dose), requires IV administration, and resulted in a statistically significant increased number of adverse effects. Finally, no RCT has shown remdesivir to reduce the mortality rate of COVID-19 patients and the above NIH recommendation in support of use conflicts with the updated November 20, 2020 recommendation by the WHO against the use of remdesivir in COVID-19, regardless of disease severity, based on findings from their SOLIDARITY trial along with 3 other RCT’s including a total of 7,000 patients. Despite this effort by an international guideline development group consisting of 28 clinical care experts, 4 patient-partners and an ethicist, the NIH COVID-19 treatment guideline, last updated December 3, continues to recommend the use of remdesivir in COVID-19.

Anti-IL-6 therapy (tocilizumab, siltuximab, sarilumab) – the NIH recommendation, last updated November 3, 2020 is a B-I against use (moderate strength, based on RCT data). Currently, only one RCT has been conducted and was negative, although it was performed prior to recommendations for corticosteroid use, indicating that as a stand-alone immunomodulatory therapy, it appears ineffective. However, a meta-analysis of findings from 16 observational trials including a total of 2,931 patients currently reports statistically significant decreases in mortality when used. Clearly the evidence for use conflicts, suggesting perhaps a “neutral” recommendation more appropriate, but the NIH rating scheme appears to weigh a single RCT over meta-analyses of observational trials in this instance.

Monoclonal Antibodies – guidance approach with these novel recombinant human monoclonal antibodies is even more complex/confusing. Currently , they (casirivimab, imdevimab, and bamlanivimab) all have an EUA (emergency authorization for use) by the FDA for patients with mild-to-moderate illness at high risk for progression. This EUA, although specifically stated that it does not constitute FDA approval of these products, appear to give the impression that they are either appropriate for use, or simply can be used as a treatment option. However, the NIH recommendation on these agents, of December 2nd, is a “neutral” one, i.e., “at this time, there are insufficient data to recommend either for or against the use of casirivimab plus imdevimab for the treatment of outpatients with mild to moderate COVID-19.” We interpret the totality of these actions to mean that these agents are permitted for use, but are not necessarily recommended for use and is thus left to clinician/patient judgement. It should be noted that these actions above were based on a single RCT whose primary endpoint, although a positive one, was the change in nasopharyngeal SARS-COV-2 levels over 7 days, a non-patient centered outcome. The secondary endpoint was a composite need for an ER visit or hospitalization, and although lower in the treated group, both were of low incidence and the data on hospitalization need compared to an ED visit was curiously not provided. Again, no mortality benefit was found with use of these, novel, high-cost agents, both requiring IV administration. However, it appears to have earned what we would interpret as a cautious, weak recommendation for use by our leading governmental health agencies. One clearly positive aspect of this action is the clear attempt to ensure an available option for early treatment with the hopes of preventing hospitalization. We encourage further such efforts, albeit with more effective and more widely available medications like ivermectin, given the numerous RCT’s showing less transmission, need for hospitalization, and fatalities.

Ivermectin  the NIH recommendation, when updated August 27, 2020 was an A-III against use, indicating “strong level”, based on “expert opinion” only. This recommendation persisted until after our review manuscript, first available on a pre-print server on November 13, 2020, and Dr. Kory’s Senate Testimony on December 8, 2020 brought significant national and international attention to the topic. We were then invited to present our detailed compilation of the existing evidence base to the NIH Guidelines panel on January 6, 2021, in collaboration with the expert consultant to the WHO, Dr. Andrew Hill. Subsequently, on January 14, 2021 the NIH upgraded their recommendation and now considers ivermectin an option for use in COVID-19 — by no longer recommending “against” the use of ivermectin for the treatment of COVID-19. A similar neutral stance applies to monoclonal antibodies and convalescent plasma, both of which are widely used in COVID-19 treatment in the U.S.

However, the FLCCC considers the Panel’s unwillingness to provide more specific guidance in support of the use of ivermectin in COVID-19 to be severely out of alignment with the known clinical, epidemiological, and observational data. Our detailed response to the Panel’s criticism of the existing evidence base can be found  here.

The first NIH recommendation, first formulated on August 27, 2020 was inexplicably an A-III against use, indicating “strong level”, based on “expert opinion” only. This recommendation persisted until after our review manuscript, first available on a pre-print server on November 13, 2020, and Dr. Kory’s Senate Testimony on December 8, 2020 brought significant national and international attention to the topic. We were then invited to present our detailed compilation of the existing evidence base to the NIH Guidelines panel on January 6, 2021, in collaboration with the expert consultant to the WHO, Dr. Andrew Hill. Subsequently, on January 14, 2021 the NIH upgraded their recommendation and now considers ivermectin an option for use in COVID-19 — by no longer recommending “against” the use of ivermectin for the treatment of COVID-19. A similar neutral stance applies to monoclonal antibodies and convalescent plasma, both of which are widely used in COVID-19 treatment in the U.S. The NIH’s last update on their recommendation was on February 12, 2021 where they continue to maintain there is “insufficient evidence” to recommend.

However, the FLCCC considers the Panel’s unwillingness to provide more specific guidance in support of the use of ivermectin in COVID-19 to be severely out of alignment with the known clinical, epidemiological, and observational data. Our detailed response to the Panel’s criticism of the existing evidence base can be reviewed in this FLCCC response letter:  FLCCC Alliance Response to the N.I.H. Guideline Committee Recommendation on Ivermectin use in COVID-19 dated February 11, 2021

Getting Ivermectin

FDA-approved drugs, like ivermectin, may be prescribed for an unapproved use (“off-label”) when the physician believes it to be medically appropriate for their patients. The FDA affords clinicians the freedom to prescribe and treat using medications that they deem to be in the best interest of the patient.

The practice of prescribing drugs “off-label” is so common that 1 out of 5 prescriptions dispensed in the U.S. is for an off-label use. The reason why off-label prescriptions are issued so frequently because there might not be an approved drug to treat a specific disease or medical condition. Also, patients may have tried all approved treatments without seeing any benefits.

  • The  NIH COVID-19 Treatment Panel states that, “Providers can access and prescribe investigational drugs or agents that are approved or licensed for other indications through various mechanisms, including Emergency Use Authorizations (EUAs), Emergency Investigational New Drug (EIND) applications, compassionate use or expanded access programs with drug manufacturers, and/or off-label use.”
  • The panel also recommends that promising, unapproved, or unlicensed treatments for COVID-19 be studied in well-designed, controlled clinical trials. This includes drugs that have been approved or licensed for other indications. It is important to note that there have been multiple published, peer-reviewed controlled clinical trials throughout the world that point to the efficacy of ivermectin in the prevention and treatment of COVID-19.
  • The panel also stipulates that the treatment recommendations in their guidelines are not mandates; but rather that “the choice of what to do or not to do for an individual patient is ultimately decided by the patient and their provider.”

Good medical practice and the best interests of the patient require that physicians use legally available drugs, biologics and devices according to their best knowledge and judgement. Doctors may prescribe what they wish as long as they believe themselves to be well-informed and basing their decision on sound medical evidence. It should be noted, however, that individual institutions may set their own standards for off-label prescriptions if they so choose.

To read more about off-label prescriptions,  click here.

We understand and empathize with the challenges faced in obtaining a prescription for ivermectin during this time period prior to its use being formally adopted in national or international COVID-19 treatment guidelines. However, we are anticipating these treatment guidelines to be updated in the near future. Alternately, please know our scientific review manuscript on ivermectin in COVID-19 is undergoing expedited peer-review at a prominent American medical journal, and if it passes peer review and becomes published, we anticipate that this will also make access to ivermectin more widespread. However, until such a time when its use as both a prophylactic and treatment agent is more widely accepted or recommended, many physicians will be reluctant to prescribe. We can only suggest the following approaches:

  • Discuss with your primary health care provider. If they are unconvinced of the data, share with them our manuscript which can be downloaded  from the FLCCC Alliance Website. Please understand that many will prefer to avoid adoption of ivermectin treatment until such a time as the guidelines are updated or the manuscript gets published.
  • The second option is to try one of the doctors that can provide telemedicine consultation here: Directory of Doctors Prescribing Ivermectin or from the table below (US only) — Confirm the price of any visit prior to the consultation. We have reports of some doctors charging exorbitant fees.
  • If more pills are desired than can be provided locally, you can order in bulk from Canadian Pharmacy King, however you will need a prescription.

If your doctor will not prescribe ivermectin for you, please contact one of the following tele-health companies (US only):

NAMELOCATIONS SERVED
Seven Cells Telehealth Platform
Stuart, FL
Ivermectin product page here

*NOTE: In order to fulfill the abundance of orders we have received, we are temporarily pausing sales of Ivermectin. Please join our wait list - we will prioritize orders on a first come, first serve basis when we restart Ivermectin sales in the middle of next week.*

Please use our telehealth platform to order all products including but not limited to IVERMECTIN. Our prescribers have no other way to review orders for our products.
Ordering is easy with our network prescribers, pharmacists, and custom compounding lab. Each telehealth consultation costs $25. Got questions? E-mail us at [email protected]
Seven Cells. Health. In Your Hands.
*Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virgin Islands, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming
Anwar Noor, MD, MPH
Afghanistan, Kost
+9( 377) 531-3155 WhatsApp
Afghanistan
Alice PIen, MD
AMA Regenerative Medicine & Skincare
Irvine, CA
(949) 208-9066

Instructions: To start the intake process call (949) 208-9066 or go to:

https://www.amaskincare.com/covid-ivermectin/
Alabama (pending license), Alaksa, California, Nevada
Robert Hildalgo, MD
AMA Regenerative Medicine & Skincare
Los Angeles, CA
(213) 460-5257

Instructions: To start the intake process call (213) 460-5257 or go to:

https://www.amaskincare.com/covid-ivermectin/
Alabama (pending license), Alaksa, California, Nevada
USA Doctors Network
Wheeling, WV
For technical support email or call:
[email protected]
(304) 218-3940
Please click on the link to select the category and start your consultation.
https://usadoctornetwork.com/

We provide doctor consults for many conditions and prescribe many different treatments that are based on real data and not political agenda.
Our nationwide consults start at $39.99 and we have low-income options as well.
Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virgin Islands, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming
Bernard Garcia, MD
ICARE VIP
Fort Lauderdale, FL
(888) 447-7902
http://www.ecarenow.net/

Instructions: Download the Zoom Cloud Meeting app. Most insurance plans accepted. $55 remote visit without insurance. COVID positive patients seen within 24 hours.
Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virgin Islands, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming
Jams P. Johnston, DO
Your Home Medical Care
Charlotte, NC
[email protected]

https://www.yourhomemedicalcare.com/

Can prescribe non-controlled substances in all 50 states, but controleld substances only in Ohio and North Carolina.
Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming
Thierry Jacquemin, MD
Medstation
Pompano Beach, FL
(954) 368-1302
[email protected]
https://app.acuitClick Here to Schedule with Medstation
Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virgin Islands, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming
A. Michael Turner, MD
Kennewick, WA
https://www.michaelturnermd.com/

Graduate of Harvard Medical School and the Mayo Clinic
Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virgin Islands, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming
Candace Teruel, DNP
Delray Beach, FL
[email protected]
(561) 914-8081 (call or text)
Candace Teruel, DNP

24 hours Telehealth service
Same Day or Next Day appointments

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virgin Islands, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming
Carlos A. Pardo, APRN-C
T.P.H.T., Inc.
Pembroke, FL
CaliMed Wellness Center

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virgin Islands, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming.
Hiren Italia, MD, CDIP, CCS
OlaMD
Tampa, FL
[email protected]
https://olamd.com/
Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virgin Islands, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming
Miguel Antonatos, MD
Text2MD
Chicago, IL
(855) 767-8559
Text2MD






Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Dakota, Nevada, New York, Oklahoma
Scott Milton Jensen, MD
Jensen Family Wellness
Lakeside, AZ
(928) 224-4270
[email protected]
Jensen Family Wellness
Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Kentucky, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin
Oyedotun Oyewole, MD
ICare Primary Care
Hendersonville, TN
(615) 239-1845
https://icareprimarycare.com/
Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee
Kristen L. Coletti-Giesler, FNP-C, ENP-C, ABAAHP
Family and Emergency Nurse Practitioner, Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner
Be-Well Medicine
Kenai, AK
(833) 848-2633
https://be-wellmedicine.com/
Alaska
Syed Haider, MD
Austin, TX
(281) 219-7367
https://www.drsyedhaider.com/
Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming
Ashley Magee
Phoenix, AZ
(602) 565-9273
[email protected]
Arizona
Clementine Family Health
Phoenix, AZ
[email protected]
https://clementinefamilyhealth.com/

Same-day and next-day online visits are available
Arizona
Jane Hendricks, NMD
Mesa, AZ
(480) 630-0168
[email protected]
https://naturopathicdoctorforyou.com/
Arizona
Loretta Hayko, FNP-BC
B2B Wellness Center
Scottsdale, AZ
(480) 656-1519
B2B Wellness Center

In-office consultation required. We do not offer telemedicine visits for Ivermectin.
Arizona
Sarah Fuller, FNP-C
Valley Mobile Medical LLC
Chandler, AZ
[email protected]obilemedical.com
https://valleymobilemedical.com/

Arizona residents only.
Arizona (AZ residents only)
Rafael Cruz, MD
Kentuckiana Integrative Medicine
Jeffersonville, IN
Kentuckiana Integrative Medicine

Instructions: Go to the website and click on the blue Telehealth box at the top of the screen.
Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Iowa, Idaho, Kansas, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Washington
Glenmore Hendricks, RNP, DNP
San Bernardino, CA
www.pushhealth.com
Arizona, California, Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, Oregon, Texas, Virginia
Janna Mustafina, CRNP
eCareNow Telehealth
Frederick, MD
(240) 815-5978
http://www.ecarenow.net/


Arizona, Colorado, District of Columbia, Florida, Maryland, Nevada, Rhode Island, Utah, Wyoming
Patricia Trafford, FNP
ANew Health
Phoenix, AZ
(480) 496-8340
http://anewhealth.org
Arizona, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, North Dakota, Nebraskas, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia
JP Denham, ARNP
Objective Health Partnership
Boise, ID
Objective Health Partnership
Arizona, Florida, Idaho, Maryland, Michigan, Oregon, Washington
Monica Orozco Cantillo, FNP
Quality NP Health Services
Miami, FL
(784) 404-1599
https://www.qnphealth.com/
Arizona, Florida, Idaho, Maryland, Minnesota, New Mexico
Felecia Sumner, DO
Synergize Direct Primary Care
Lansdowne, PA
Synergy Direct Primary Care
Arizona, Florida, Illinois, North Carolina, New Jersey, Pennsylvania
Charles Lewis, ND
Simplify Your Life
Mountain Home, AR
(870) 277-1172
Arkansas
Robert C. Karas, MD
Karas Health Care
Fayetteville, AR
(479) 770-4343
https://karashealthcare.com/
Arkansas, Idaho, Guam, Missouri, Montana, Texas, Virgin Islands
Pedro Toweh, MD, FAIHM, ABOIM
Premier Integrative Medical Group
Battle Creek, MI
(269) 224-6052
[email protected]
Arkansas, Indiana, Michigan
Andre Fares Porto, MD
Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil
+55 19 99112-3572 (WhatsApp)
[email protected]
Brazil
Corinto Viano Pereira, MD, PhD
OTOFACE RECIFE
Rsife, Pernambuco, Brazil
+55 (81) 98810-5662
https://www.otofacerecife.com.br/
Brazil
Fabio Lopez Buenos Netto, MD
Clinic Bem Estar, Sao Paulo, Brazil
All states served
+55-11-99-118-5051 (WhatsApp)
[email protected]
Brazil
Jussara Franca Resende, MD
MEDITT
Sao Bernardo do Campo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
MEDITT
Brazil
Virginia Rodrigues de Camargo, MD
Tres Rios, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
+2-499-979-8736
[email protected]
Brazil
Andre Luz Da Rosa, MD
Joinville, Santa Catarina, Brazil
+4 899-167-5111 (WhatsApp)
[email protected]
Brazil
John M. Strong, MD
Vo Medical Center
El Centro, CA
(760) 562-2688
Vo Medical Center
California
Martin Falappino, DO
Porterville, CA
[email protected]

California only. NO telehealth services.
California
Melissa Mondala, MD
Dr. Lifestyle
Newport Beach, CA
(949) 569-8877
[email protected]
Dr. Lifestyle
California
Tom Yarema, MD
Center for Wellness & Integrative Medicine with Tom Yarema, M.D.
Soquel, CA

https://drtomyarema.com/ivermectin-info/

Dr. Tom holds open clinic hours on Tuesdays at 5pm PST via Zoom. Please visit website to schedule. California only; some TELEHEALTH services available within California.
California
Jolene Nawrocki, DNP
Starfish Wellness
Wheat Ridge, CO
https://mystarfishwellness.janeapp.com/
California, Colorado, Florida
Linda W. Ho, MD
Vibrant Health MD, PLLC
Plano, TX
(214) 918-7222
https://vibranthealthmd.com/index.html<a/<
California, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Ohio, Kentucky, New Jersey, Texas
Luis C. Cordova, APRN, FNP-C
Limitless Aesthetics and Healthcare
Santa Teresa, NM
(915) 496-3442 or (915) 593-9496
https://limitlessaesthetics.com/
California, Florida, New Mexico, New York, Texas
Victor Cunha Coelho, MD
Push Health
Scottsdale, AZ
Victor Cunha Coelho, MD
California, North Carolina, South Carolina
Margaret Aranda, MD
Aranda MD Enterprises
West Hills, CA
(818) 852-2225 (call or text)
[email protected]
Aranda MD Enterprises
California, Oklahoma
Joel Lopez, MD, CNS, DABAARM
Makati City, Philippines
A4M, ACAP, IFM, PRIMA-Philippines
+63-917-896-0237
https://JLopezMD.com/

California and the Philippines.
California, Philippines
Robert Lowery, MD, MS
Boerne, TX
(210) 499-0990
[email protected]
California, Texas
Brienne Stoneberger, FNP-BC
5900 Health
Parker, CO
(720) 536-8427
[email protected]
5900 Health
Colorado
Chad Prusmack, MD
Resilience Code
Lone Tree, CO
(303) 577-1916
Resilience Code
Colorado
Denise M Chism, MSN, NP
Bella Health + Wellness
Littleton, CO
(719) 435-7070
Bella Health + Wellness
Colorado
Scott Rollins, MD
AdvantAge Integrative Medicine
Grand Junction, CO
(970) 245-6911
Integrative Medicine Center of Western Colorado
Colorado
Pamela Svendsen, MD
Navarre Wellness, Navarre, FL
(850) 936-8343
[email protected]
Navarre Wellness
Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Mississippi
William Franklin, MD
Victory Medical Clinic & Pharmacy
Austin, TX
(512) 462-3627
https://www.victorymed.com

Pharmacy Licensed for prescriptions in the following states: AZ, CO, FL, GA, IL, IN, KY, ME, MN, MT, NC, NH, NM, NJ, NY, PA, RI, SC, SD, UT, TX, VT, WA, WI, WY.
Colorado, Florida, Idaho, New York, Texas
John R. Roland, MD
Evolution Medicine Dallas
Dallas, TX
https://www.evolutionmedicinedallas.com/
Colorado, Texas
Freedom Healthcare
Glenwood Springs, CO
https://freedomhealthcare.me/

Telehealth appointments only.
Connecticut, Idaho, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Wyoming, New York, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Washington
Cynthia Lee Hall, DO, FACOG, DABOG
Freedom Healthcare
Glenwood Springs, CO
https://freedomhealthcare.me/

Connecticut, Idaho, Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Wyoming, New York, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Washington
Robert J. Aquino, MD
Gold Coast Medical Wellness PLLC
Huntington, NY
(631) 547-4100
Gold Coast Medical Wellness
Connecticut, New Jersey, New York
Cammie Baird, RN, APRN, FNP-BC
Be at Home Primary Care, LLC
Palmetto, FL
(941) 565-4924
[email protected]
Florida
Danielle M. Carrera, DNP, APRN
Push Health
Tampa, FL
https://www.Pushhealth.com

Please go to Pushealth.com and use code: DCARRERA
Florida
Deepti Sadhwani, MD
Quality Health Care & Wellness Institute
Florida, Sebastian
(772) 473-5212

https://qhcwellness.com/
Florida
Fernando A. Laraucente, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, NP-C
Laracuente HealthCare Associates
3880 S. Ocean Blvd, Ste 319
Hollywood, FL
(954) 451-1743
[email protected]
Florida
Janice A. Dennis, APRN, FNP-C, CCRN
Jupiter, FL
(561) 847-0573 (call or text)
[email protected]
Florida
Kamila Tursi, DNP-FNP-BC
Integrative Medicine
Fort Myers, FL
(239) 822-2088 (text only)
[email protected]
The Med Spa
Florida
Khristopher M. Lugo, PA
SCCM
3644 Henderson Blvd, Ste B
Tampa, FL 33609
(844) 789-2266
SCCM
Florida
Knadia Scott, MPH, FNP-BC, ARNP
Plant City, FL
(561) 236-8382
[email protected]

Telehealth services in Florida only.
Florida
Laura McLauchlin, DNP, APRN
Begin Health, LLC
Jacksonville, FL
(904) 515-3337
[email protected]
Begin Health, LLC
Florida
Michael Austin, DO
Affinity Wellness Group
Tampa, FL
(813) 964-5901
[email protected]
Affinity Wellness Group

Provider can prescribe only to patients living or visiting Florida.
Florida
Steve Tieche, MD
Recharge Clinic & Pharmacy
Ocala, FL
(352) 512-9996
https://rechargeocalaclinic.com/
Florida
Susan Spell, MSN, FNP-BC, DipACLM
Headwaters Health
Jacksonville, FL
(904) 290-6028
Headwaters Health
Florida
Thomas L. Edwards, DO
San Antonio, FL
https://www.pushhealth.com/

Enter code TEDWARDS online.
Florida
Tim Blend, MD
The Blend Institute
Blake Medical Center
Bradenton, FL
(941) 722-5600
TheBlendeInstitute
Florida
Vanessa Hamalian, APRN
Latitude Clinic LLC
Sarasota, FL
(941) 253-2530
https://www.latitudeclinic.com//

Florida
William Cole Jr., MD
Retire The Pandemic
Sarasota, FL
www.RetireThePandemic.com/Florida
Florida
Fred Harvery, MD
The Harvey Center
Sarasota, FL
(941) 929-9355
[email protected]

https://www.harveycenter.com/
Florida
Michael Carter, MD
Marietta, GA
(702) 241-5439
https://www.healthrevivalpartners.com/
Florida, Georgia
Nadia D. Taylor, MD
Essential Wellness Group
Boca Raton, FL
Essential Wellness Group
Florida, Georgia
Stasha-Gae Roberts, Adult - Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner
Compassion Primary Care
Tampa, FL
(813) 669-3084
Compassion Primary Care
Florida, Idaho
Felecia Sumner, DO
Lansdowne, PA
Synergy Direct Primary Care
Florida, Illinois, New New Jesey, Pennsylvania
Lorie Pistone, AANP-BC
Doctor's Studio
Boca Raton, FL
(561) 418-8421
(971) 256-9206 Oregon
[email protected]
Doctor's Studio
Florida, Maryland, Nebraska, Oregon, West Virginia
Doctor's Studio
Boca Raton, FL
(561) 418-6421
[email protected]
Doctor's Studio
Florida, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Washington, West Virginia
Nabeel Kouka, MD, DO, MBA, MPH
Salus Neuromuscular Institute
Aventura, FL
(305) 280-0505
Salus MD
Florida, New York
Michelle Eva Morholt, DNP, FNP-C, QMP, ARNP, APRN
UBUcares
Bellevue, WA
(360) 230-8070
https://ubucares.com/
Florida, Utah, Washington
Nicola Jasmin Kaur Sarohia, MD
Free World Medical
Davie, FL
[email protected]
https://www.freeworldmed.com/
Florida, Washington
John B. Abbell, MD
Georgia Functional Medicine
Albany, GA
[email protected]
Georgia Functional Medicine
Georgia
Joseph A. DeStefano Jr., MD
Urgent Care 24/7
Savanna, GA
Urgent Care 24/7
Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia
Joseph W. Petrie, PA
Gem Express Care
Challis, ID
(208) 833-3773
[email protected]
Gem Express Care
Idaho
Alan Bain, MD
Chicago Health & Wellness Alliance
Chicago, IL
(312) 236-7010 ext. 2
[email protected]
DocIntheLoop
Illinois
Darrell DeMello, MD, MBBS, MBA
Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
+91-8097249586
[email protected]

Licenced to practice in India. Can provide tele-consultation for diagnosis and suggested treatment to patients in most countries. Not licensed to practice/prescribe in USA, Canada, UK.
India
Jagadish G. Donki, MD
Bangalore, Karnataka, India
91 984 591 7230
[email protected]
India
Akshat Singh Thakur, MD,
Remedo Connecting Healthcare
New Delhi, India
Remedo Connecting Healthcare
India
Melissa Donahue, FNP-BC
FFR Health
West lafayette, IN
(765) 201-0746
[email protected]
FFR Health
Indiana
Susan Julian, NP
Julian Healthcare
Cambridge City, IN
(765) 530-8008
[email protected]
Julian Healthcare
Indiana
Vishaal Veerula, MD
Fort Wayne Integrative Medicine
Fort Wayne, IN
https://www.fwimed.com/
Indiana
Lee Martin, MD, MB, BS, FRCS, (EDIN)
Kingston, Jamaica
(876) 816-0756
[email protected]
Jamaica
Yoko Masuda, MD
BFL Clinic
Shizuouka, Japan
+8 (154) 270-5155
[email protected]
https://bfl-clinic.com/
Japan
Rogan M. Tilley, MD
WHOLEhealth MHK, LLC
Manhattan, KS
(785) 775-1155
https://wholehealthmhk.com/
Kansas
William Klompus, MD
Baptist Health
Madisonville, KY
Kentucky
Robert W. Calhoun, MD
Paraclete Health Solutions
Monroe, LA
(318) 816-9055
Paraclete Health Solutions
Louisiana
Thomas K. Bond., Sr., MD, MS
TotalCare Health & Wellness Medical Clinic
Lafayette, LA
(337) 264-7209
https://totalcare-la-com/
Louisiana, North Carolina
Paul Gabriel Gosselin, MD
Patriot's Health
Watterville, ME

[email protected]
https://patriots-health.com/

To make appointment go to website or send email. Do not call.
Maine
Kenneth B. Singleton, MD, MPH
Cytokine Storm Solutions
Townsend, MD
(410) 296-3737
[email protected]

No Telehealth services will be available until late August. New Covid-19 patients can be seen IN PERSON ONLY in our Maryland office until TeleHealth services are available.


Maryland
Leonard J. Leo, MD
Today's Integrative Health
North Bethesda, MD
(301) 770-6650
Today's Integrative Health
Maryland
Sultana Afrooz, DO
Be the Change Health & Wellness Center
Columbia, MD
(301) 970-9724
https://www.bethechangewellnesscenter.com/
Maryland
Mimi Peak, MD
Medical and Longevity Center of Virginia
Newport News, VA
(757) 599-7899
MLCVA
Maryland, Virginia
Mylene T Huynh, MD, MPH, FAAFP, IFMCP
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
Fairfax, VA
(703) 854-1108
[email protected]
Truepoint Health
Maryland, Virginia
Maria Sonia Meza Vargas, MD, FACCP, FRCPC
American British Cowdray Hospital
American British Cowdray Hospital
Mexico
Alberto Mendez Campos, MDC.
Querétaro 157, Roma Nte., Cuauhtémoc, 06700
Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico
555-416-4955
[email protected]
Dr. Alberto Mendez
Mexico
Armando Lagardo Tinajero, MD
Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico
+52 (662) 411-3878
[email protected]
Mexico, Spain
Kristina Lelcu, MD
North Star Family Medicine
Brainerd, MN
(218) 382-2780
https://www.northstarfamilymedicine.org/

No telehealth services, in-office appointment required.
Minnesota
Charles J. Gruich
Biloxi, MS
Charles J. Gruich MD
Mississippi
Christina Brown, FNP
Elite Total Wellness
Memphis, TN
(901) 505-2017
[email protected]
Mississippi, Tennessee
Timothy Hubbard, MHSc, MPAS, PA-C
417 House Calls
Springfield, MO
(417) 363-3900
[email protected]
417 House Calls
Missouri
Poppy Daniels, MD
Ozark, MO
(417) 485-5700
[email protected]
Missouri, Pennsylvania
David S. Costner, FNP
Costner Care Family Clinic
Plains, MT Located outside Montana? Thank you for reaching out. Unfortunately we do not serve patients outside of Montana but are thank for FLCCC's network.
(406) 540-5757
[email protected]
_blank">https://costnercarefamily.clinic/


Looking for prophylaxis, not currently Ill? Thank you for your inquiry. At this point, we are extremely busy with established patients & caring for patients who are acutely ill. Please contact your primary care provider regarding prophylaxis. If you do not have a primary care provider & suffer flu symptoms contact us right away and we will try to get you in for a telemedicine or in-person respiratory clinic visit within 24 hours. Thank you for your understanding and apologize for any inconvenience.
Montana
Brian J Weinstein, MS, APN, NPC, RN
Synergy Health DPC
Skokie, IL
(888) 329-0120 (call or text)
[email protected]
Synergy Health DPC
Nationwide
Jason N. Cox, MD
Alma, GA
(912) 632-6000

Telemedicine appointments available. Office hours M-F, 8a-6p. Weekend and after-hours available for COVID positive patients only.
Nationwide
Arezo Fathie, MD
Generations Medical Center
Las Vegas, NV
(702) 407-9994
Nevada
James M. Gocke, NP
Minden, NV
(661) 810-9076
[email protected]

Leave message.
Nevada
Josie Cervantes, NP
Medallus Medical Urgent Care
Elko, Nevada
(775) 400-1510
Medallus Medical Urgent Care
Nevada
Nicole Schertell, ND
Vibrant Health Naturopathic Medical Center
Portsmouth, NH
(603) 610-8882
Vibrant Health Naturopathic Medical Center

Only serving patients in New Hampshire for Telehealth and in-person visits.
New Hampshire
Alieta Eck, MD
Piscataway, NJ
(732) 463-0303
[email protected]
New Jersey
Joaquin E. Gonzalez-Melquaides, PA-C, MS Blairstown, NJ [email protected] https://telemedpa.com/New Jersey
Vincent Leonti, MD
Princeton Integrative Medicine
Lawrenceville, NJ
(609) 512-1468
Princeton Integrative Medicine
New Jersey
Alexander Klashtorny, MD
Jersey Anesthesia and Pain Management
Ediston, NJ
(732) 738-3963
[email protected]
NJ Pain Away
New Jersey, New York
Jennifer Baer, NP
Horizons of Health
Latham, NY
(518) 755-6870
https://www.horizonsofhealth.com/
New York
Jennifer Goldstok, BSN, MSN, ANP-BC
synRG integrative Health & Wellness
Latham, NY
(518) 218-4455
synRG integrative Health & Wellness
New York
Mary-Beth Charno, MSN, RN, A-GNP-C
Bellport, NY
Mary-Beth Charno
New York
Sharon Herzfeld, MD
Integrative and Holistic Care
New York, NY
(646)717-0380
[email protected]
https://www.holisticneuro.com/
New York
Yusuf Saleeby, MD
Carolina Holistic Medicine
Charleston, SC
[email protected]
Carolina Holistic Medicine

E-mail for appointment.
North Carolina, South Carolina
Shandra Basil, DO
Basil Family Medicine
Columbus, OH
(614) 559-8142
Basil Family Medicine

Provides outpatient care only.
Ohio
AccuDoc Urgent Care
Batesville, IN
(812) 932-3224
[email protected]
https://AccuDoc Urgent Care

Not associated with My Free Doctor.
Ohio, Indiana
Ross Medical Care
Tulsa, OK 74137
(918) 638-8142
Okalhoma
Gina L. Davis, MD
Edmond, OK
(405) 341-6009

https://www.signatureskincare.com/
Oklahoma
Greg J. Dennis, MD and Lydia Jemison Dennis, MD
Vibrant Life Direct Care
Mustang, OK
(405) 376-1381
https://www.vibrantlifedc.com/
Oklahoma
Wesley J. Merritt, MD
Allen, TX
[email protected]
Oklahoma, Texas
Karen Sagner, NP
Push Health, Family Nurse Practitioner
Culver, OR
https://www.pushhealth.com/practices/225174/new-patients/ksagner
Oregon
Robert Sayson, MD
Good News Community Health Clinic
Portland, OR
(503) 489-0567
https://goodnewschc.org/
Oregon
Tom Messenger, ND, RN
Bear Creek Naturopathic Clinic
Medford, OR
(541) 770-5563
https://www.bearcreekclinic.com/
Oregon
Abigail Jo Bisson, ND
Salem, OR
(503) 371-1558
https://doctorbisson.com/
Oregon
Jennifer Wright, NS, ACP-C
Doctor's Studio
Boca Raton, FL
Oregon: (971) 256-9206
Washington: (253) 285-1979
[email protected]
Doctor's Studio
Oregon, Washington
George L. Danielewski, MD
Philadelphia, PA
(215) 338-8866
Pennsylvania
Clarice Van Vreden, MD
Hartbeespoort, North West, South Africa
012-259-1059
Ifafimedical.com
South Africa
Kristen A. Lindgren, MD
Lindgren Functional Medicine
Green Bay, WI
(920)737-1625
https://lindgren.health/
South Africa
Erika Drewes, MD
Capetown, South Africa
(2-721-201-7036)
Erika Drewes, MD
South Africa, Cape Town
Shawnie Perkins, PAC
Arbor Vitae Medical Center
Fort Mill, SC
(803) 881-9990
[email protected]
https://www.arborvitaemedical.com/
South Carolina
Kimberly M. DeVolld, MD
Carolina Health & Wellness Pediatric & Adult Medicine
Johns Island, SC
(843) 996-4908
CHWPEDS
South Carolina, Virginia
Leonardo Reyes Ortez, MD
Barcelona, Catalonia
(+54 681-295-792)
[email protected]
Dr. Leonardo Jose Reyes Cruz
Spain, Barcelona, Catalonia
A.H.M. Marjan, MD, MBBS, MRCG [INT], PGDCY [COL]; MSc in PHY. EDU [COL]
Beeruwala, Western Province, Sri Lanka
Abrar Medicare Colloge of GPs of Sri Lanka

https://abrarmedicare.scvlk.com/
Sri Lanka
Kai-Joe Tsai, MD
Dr. Tsai Kari-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic
Taipei, Taiwan
Dr. Tsai Clinic
Taiwan
Lee Howard, MD
Nashville, TN
(615) 307-7246
[email protected]
Bella Vita Health and Wellness

Tennessee residents only.
Tennessee
Audrey Jones, DO
Advantage Health
St. Augustine, TX
(956) 325-3138
Texas
Cami Jo Tice-Harouff, DNP, APR
N, FNP-C
Hesed Health Clinic
Longview, TX
[email protected]
(502) 550-6462
Texas
Cheryl Winter, DCN, FNP-BC, APRN, RDN
Health Steps RX, Inc.
Conroe, TX
(832) 327-9332
[email protected]
Health Steps RX
Texas
Christina Dawn Kern, MSN, APRN, FNP-C
Old Rugged Cross Healthcare
Hockley, TX
(832) 521-3839
<a href="https://www.oldruggedcrosshealthcare.com/" target="_blank"https://www.oldruggedcrosshealthcare.com/

Texas only.
Texas
Deborah M. Holubec, MD
Regional Pain Care of North Texas
Plano, TX
(214) 509-9691
[email protected]
Texas
Derek Farley, DO
Precision Direct Primary Care
Denton, TX
(469) 415-0909
https://precisiondpc.com/

Ivermectin prescriptions for Covid 19 treatment or prophylaxis can be written for patients in the practice or those who would like to join. Must be local to Denton, TX or the Northern DFW area.
Texas
Jerry Holubec, DO
Allen, TX
(972) 672-8921
[email protected]
Texas
John Garcia, MD
Odessa, TX
432-582-0300
https://www.johngarciamd.com/
Texas
John Roland, MD
Retire The Pandemic
Dallas, TX
www.RetireThePandemic.com/Texas
Texas
Kami Owen, APRN, FNP-BC, ENP
You Only Younger
Sugar Land, TX
(281) 937-7537
You Only Younger
Texas
Katarina Lindley, DO
Eagle Medical Center Direct Primary Care
Brock, TX
(817) 550-7409
Texas
Kimberly Barbolla, DO, FACOI
East Texas Precision Medicine
Marshall, TX
(903) 320-3200
East Texas Precision Medicine
Texas
Mary Talley Bowden, MD
BreatheMD
Houston, TX
(713) 492-2340
BreatheMD

Telehealth appointments for $130.00.
Texas
Priya Visweswaran Balakrishnan, MD
The Immortality Institute
Houston, TX
https://www.theimmortalityinstitute.com/
Texas
Rena Sayler, DO
My Emergency Room 24/7
[email protected]
My Emergency Room

In-person evaluations 24/7/365 in one of our three locations: My ER 24/7 in San Marcos and Abilene and My Urgent Care in Boerne, TX. Telemedicine is through the Care Convene for Patients App. Enter code DOC247, then start session. Cost is $50.00. It is manned as much as possible. We call in Rxs preferentially to Uptown Pharmacy in Dallas, which will ship anywhere overnight. Their price is $154.00 for two months' prophylaxis or full treatment dose. Their number is 214-935-9092.
Texas
Richard J. Gluck, DO
Alpine, TX
(469) 831-7762
https://docgluck.com/
Texas
Richard Todd, MPAS, PA-C
Camrock Clinic
Rockdale, TX
(512) 446-2277
Texas
Ronald Charles Ross, MD
New Braunfels, TX
(830) 302-7245
[email protected]

Texas only.
Texas
Susan Harris, MSN, CNP, FNP-C
Lifestream Health Centre
Coppell, TX
(972) 304-6400
[email protected]
Lifestream Med

Coppell, TX only.
Texas
Teresa Saavedra, DO, MS
TruHealth Family Clinic
Brownsville, TX
(956) 413-6162
https://www.truhealth.clinic/
Texas
Beverly Hall, APRN, FNP-C
Care at Your Fingertips
Salt Lake City, UT
[email protected]
https://www.pushhealth.com/

Push Health Virtual Concierge Medical: Use code BHALL99.
Utah
Layne Kamalu, MD
Kaysville Clinic
Kaysville, UT
(801) 544-4227
Kaysville Clinic
Utah
Steven Jones, NP, MSN
Alpine Clinic
Lehi, UT
(801) 407-3000
Alpine Clinic
Utah
Todd W. Cameron, BSN, NMD
Cameron Wellness and Spa
Salt Lake City, UT
(801) 486-4226
[email protected]
https://cameronwellnessandspa.com/
Utah
Sasha Grams, DO
Country Road Family Medicine and Acupuncture
Luray, VA
(540) 743-5555
Country Road Family Medicine and Acupuncture
Virginia
Kara M. Nakisbendi, MD
Holistic Naturopathic Medical Center
Bellevue, WA
[email protected]
Holistic Naturopathic Medical Center
Washington
Karl William Lambert, FNP, MS, RN
Pacific Northwest Wellness Center, PLCC
East Wenatchee, WA

https://www.theredimeclinic.com/
Washington
Adam Christopher Miller, MD
ARISE MD
Milwaukee, WI
(414) 386-2600
ARISE MD
Wisconsin
Brianna Klotz, DNP, APNP, FNP-C
St. Anne's Clinic
Oshkosh, WI
(920) 234-6970
https://watercitycaremission.org/st-annes-clinic/
Wisconsin
Sandra Arce-Garzon, MD
Retire The Pandemic
Milwaukee, WI
www.RetireThePandemic.com/Wisconsin
Wisconsin
Amanda Vignaroli, DNP, FNP-BC
Bellla Vita Health and Wellness
Casper, WY
(307) 262-3156
[email protected]
https://provider.kareo.com/amanda-vignaroli



Wyoming
Amanda Mitchell, MSPAC, PA-C
Push Health
Fort Payne, AL

No. Although it is true that in some states in the U.S., pharmacists have the right to refuse to fill a prescription, they can only do so if they are concerned about potential harm to the patient, a concern that is valid in few circumstances such as the following;

  1. A known allergy – i.e. the pharmacist would need to cite a documented history of an allergic reaction during prior treatment with ivermectin that the provider has not indicated they were aware of
  2. A known adverse interaction with another medication the patient is taking. In this case, the pharmacist would need to cite an absolute contraindication to concurrent use with another medication.  Since there are no absolute contraindications to any medicine given with ivermectin (only dose adjustments or monitoring of levels are required with some) this reason is invalid.
  3. The prescribed dose is above the recommended dosage – given that studies using ivermectin doses up to 10 times the FDA approved dose of 0.2mg/kg have not been associated with any increased adverse effects, this reason would be invalid. Further, doctors can and do prescribe medicines above normal doses for patients and this practice is perfectly legal. Finally, of the many treatment studies of ivermectin in COVID-19, multi-day dose regimens of up to 0.3mg/kg have been used with no reported increase in adverse effects.

Note that if a pharmacist refuses to fill the ivermectin prescription by claiming that “it is not recommended or approved for COVID-19” they should be made aware of the following:

  • NIH treatment guidelines are not mandates and thus do not and cannot restrict any provider’s decision to prescribe a medication that the NIH Guidelines panel does not recommend. As stated in the  Introduction to the NIH guideline for COVID-19:
    • “It is important to stress that the rated treatment recommendations in these Guidelines should not be considered mandates. The choice of what to do or not to do for an individual patient is ultimately decided by the patient and their provider.”
  • “Off-label” prescribing of a medicine that has received FDA-approval for another indication is both legal and common. Further, it is estimated that one in five prescriptions written today are for such off-label use.

Thus, if a pharmacist refuses to fill a prescription without an accepted indication for refusal as above, this can be considered “practicing medicine.” Given that pharmacists have no legal right to practice medicine, in such a case, a complaint to the state medical licensing board may be appropriate. Further, the permit holder/store owner, the pharmacist in charge, the pharmacist who refuses to fill a prescription, and the wholesaler are all licensed by their state’s Board of Pharmacy. A complaint for unprofessional conduct can be filed against each with the appropriate Board of Pharmacy.

 State Boards of Pharmacy
 State Medical Licensing Boards

Vitamins We Recommend

Having sufficient levels of Vitamin D is very important for supporting the immune system and reducing the severity of Covid-19. Please click on the “additional medicines” tab at this link to read studies on the importance of Vitamin D in preventing and treating Covid-19.  Please share this information with your physician.

Vitamin C is water soluble and is transported through the small intestines by a protein transporter and binds to SVC21 receptors in the gut. These transporters become saturated and cannot accept more Vitamin C over a certain dosage. Therefore higher doses do not yield higher plasma concentrations of Vitamin C. Liposomal Vitamin C uses the exact same transporters and receptors that regular Vitamin C uses in the body therefore there is no benefit in using Liposomal Vitamin C. The only way to administer higher doses of Vitamin C to achieve higher plasma concentrations is to bypass the absorption in the gut and administer the Vitamin C intravenously. VItamin C also works synergistically with Quercetin.

Other Preventive Care

The aggressive spread of Covid-19 is thought to be primarily due to airborne (aerosol) spread. Inhaling tiny floating droplets directly into the nose/lungs is strongly, but not perfectly, prevented by wearing masks indoors, with the N95/FFP2/FFP3 masks providing far better protection than any “standard” masks.

It is the opinion of the FLCCC that mask wearing is critical, but in far fewer situations than is recommended by most public health agencies and the CDC. The risks of outdoor transmission are so low that unless in the midst of a large crowd in stagnant air, masks are not necessary outdoors. In indoor spaces, benefits of standard masks are largely limited to rooms with small dimensions, high density crowds, little draft present, and prolonged duration (the “4 D’s”). Thus, in cavernous spaces, with high ceilings, good ventilation or in places for short periods (most grocery stores, hotel lobby’s, shopping malls) masks likely add little protection. The challenge is that authorities are unable to make specific rules for the complex variety of indoor spaces that exist. The safest and most pragmatic approach would be to wear a mask (and expect others to) in any confined space where you will spend a prolonged duration with non-household members. Unfortunately, this approach may violate local ordinances depending where you live.

For more information, read Masks! – Clearing up the Confusion also on this website.

Gargling and rinsing (not swallowing, drinking) mouthwash solutions and using nasal sprays or nasal rinses are done to reduce the viral load in the nose and throat which in turn reduce the symptoms and severity of disease. This is likely more important with the Delta variant given it replicates faster and creates higher viral loads. Povidone iodine nose spray/drops should not be used longer than 5 days in pregnancy.

What mouthwash? Any mouthwash containing cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) has broad antimicrobial properties and is effective in controlling gingivitis and gingival plaque. Examples of mouthwashes with CPC are Scope™, ACT™, and Crest™.

What nasal spray or rinse? Use 1% povidone-iodine commercial nasal spray as per instructions 2-3 x daily. If 1% product is not available, dilute the more widely available 10% solution and apply 4-5 drops to each nostril 4-5x daily for post-exposure prevention and the early symptomatic period.

To make 1% povidone/iodine concentrated solution from 10% povidone/iodine solution, IT MUST BE DILUTED FIRST. One dilution method is as follows:

  • First pour 1½ tablespoons (25 ml) of 10% povidone/iodine solution into a nasal irrigation bottle of 250 mL
  • Then fill to top with distilled, sterile or previously boiled water
  • Tilt head back, apply 4-5 drops to each nostril. Keep tilted for a few minutes, let drain. No more than 5 days in pregnancy.

Steroids We Recommend for Hospital Treatment

No. Methylprednisolone is the most effective steroid to use to treat Covid-19 in the inflammatory phase of the virus. Methylprednisolone has both genomic and non-genomic effects on SARS-COV2 and it penetrates the lung tissues more effectively than Dexamethasone. Areas of the world that do not have Methylprednisolone can use Prednisolone as an alternative. Dexamethasone has fewer genomic effects on SARS-COV2 than both Methylprednisolone and Prednisolone. If providers choose to use Dexamethasone, then they should prescribe the dose in mg/kg and not give a fixed dose of 6 mg to all patients for 7-10 days (equivalent to 30 mg Methylprednisolone). This dexamethasone protocol is modeled after the dexamethasone RECOVERY trial.

Long Haul Covid Treatment

This protocol has been drafted but is now being reviewed by our entire medical team.  We expect to have it posted on this website before the middle of June.  We will be explaining it on our Weekly Update on Wednesday, June 16th.  Stay tuned!

About the Covid Vaccines

The FLCCC Alliance has always maintained that our protocols are a bridge to vaccines and a safety net for those who cannot or have not been vaccinated or are vaccinated and have concerns regarding declining protection against emerging variants. Vaccines have shown efficacy in preventing the most severe outcomes of COVID-19 and are an important part of a multi-modal strategy that must also include early treatment. The decision to get a vaccine should be made in consultation with your health care provider.

Yes. If someone is suffering from a post vaccine syndrome, FLCCC clinicians and a growing network of colleagues have reported significant clinical responses to ivermectin. Please refer to our I-RECOVER protocol for further information.

Although we lack sufficient data to provide definitive guidance,  based on pathophysiologic principles, we estimate that ivermectin is unlikely to significantly impact vaccine efficacy.

About our Services

Given the sheer volume of requests and the limited number of expert clinicians that make up the FLCCC Alliance, the doctors are not able to respond to individual requests for expert consultation on patients ill with COVID-19. Furthermore, we cannot provide treatment recommendations for patients that are not under our direct care. However, we can offer interested patients, families, and health care providers our COVID-19 treatment expertise and guidance contained in our published and pre-published manuscripts. Given that the majority of requests for consultation have been on cases where patients are failing standard therapies, we suggest that those interested review the section on “salvage therapies” in  An FLCCC Alliance guide to the management of COVID-19 (#24, p. 19). We also emphasize the importance of recognizing that COVID-19 respiratory disease is not a viral pneumonia, but rather an “organizing pneumonia”, and as such, in fulminant cases, would typically require high doses of corticosteroids as in our protocol. For support of this, please refer to our paper on “SARS-CoV-2 Organizing Pneumonia” ( www.bmjopenrespres.bmj.com). Lastly, we recommend that patients ill with COVID-19 at any stage of disease receive ivermectin, as per the accompanying manuscript which compiles and reviews the large evidence base supporting this therapy.

The mission statement of the FLCCC can be found here. Legal questions can be referred to Ralph Lorigo, the attorney who has successfully sued several hospitals on behalf of patients’ families to force hospitals to administer ivermectin to desperately ill patients when the drug has been prescribed by the patients’ personal care physicians. Several judges have ruled in favor of the patients on the basis of the scientific information about ivermectin’s safety and efficacy in treating COVID-19 that the FLCCC Alliance has assisted in supplying to the courts. Lawyers who have shown a desire to work pro bono to help such families should also contact Ralph Lorigo at https://www.lorigo.com.

Finding Weekly Updates

Here is the link for the Weekly Updates. Additionally all videos, articles, and press information can be found here.

Beating Censorship

We are doing our best to keep the most recent information and breaking news up to date through our website, social media, and our weekly updates. We have started a Telegram account which you can follow here: https://t.me/FLCCC_Alliance where you can read, share, and post all of our information through this platform or through your current social media platforms.